LIKE
Good article? Vote
+1 point
17 votes
Loading...

Photos Of Afghanistan Before The Wars

Young students dancing to music on a school playground.

21. Afghan workers make a street repair in Kabul.

Afghan workers make a street repair in Kabul.

22. An Afghan Army parade through Kabul. Nationalism grew, as people identified with the nation rather than with tribes.

An Afghan Army parade through Kabul.

23. Afghanistan had a modern military since reforms by King Amanullah Khan in the 1920s.

Afghan military band.

24. New Year’s Celebration.

New Year's Celebration.

25. Carving detail on an arch.

Carving detail on an arch.

26. A mosque building stands west to the mausoleum of King Abdul Rahman — in the present Zarnigar Park, center of Kabul — which was the Bostan Serai built by King Habibullah (son of King Abdul Rahman). Today is stands as a store room for the Department of Preservation of Monuments, Ministry of Culture.

A mosque building stands west to the mausoleum of King Abdul Rahman -- in the present Zarnigar Park, center of Kabul -- which was the Bostan Serai built by King Habibullah (son of King Abdul Rahman). Today is stands as a store room for the Department of Preservation of Monuments, Ministry of Culture.

27. Students at the Higher Teachers College of Kabul. Women weren’t required to wear burqas, but some would still cover up by choice.

Students at the Higher Teachers College of Kabul where Dr. Podlich, the photographer, worked and taught for two year's with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

28. Kids grew up in a safe environment, unafraid of extremist influence.

Young students dancing to music on a school playground.

29. The schools were co-educational.

American International School of Kabul (AISK), Senior English class. Peg Podlich is on the left. "I was in my senior year (my final year) of high school and I attended the American International School of Kabul out on Darul-aman Road.Ê In Tempe, I had walked four blocks to school; in Kabul a school bus stopped outside our home. Jan and I ran out when the driver honked the horn. On the bus, we were supervised by Indian ladies, wearing saris of course, and were driven with about 20 kids back through Kabul, around the hill to the west side of town. " - Peg Podlich

30. Shopping for scarves.

Jan Podlich on a shopping trip in Istalif. Jan in a short, sleeveless dress and the woman to the right in a chadri (burka). We arrived in Kabul one sunshiny morning in June... My dad met us and was able to whisk us through the customs. We proceeded into Kabul in a UN ÒkombiÓ (kind of an old school SUV). I was tired, but I can remember being amazed at the sight of colorful (dark blue, green and maroon) ÒghostsÓ that were wafting along the side of the road. My dad explained there were women underneath those chadris, and that some women had to wear them out in public. We never called the garments Òburkas.Ó Depending on the country, women practicing purdah (Islamic custom requiring women to cover up) wear different styles of coverings, which have different names." - Peg Podlich.

31. An Afghan boy decorates cakes.

An Afghan boy decorates cakes.

32. Young men cooking kebabs.

Young men cooking kebabs. "... Don't get me started about the smell and taste of lamb kebobs straight from the brazier!Ê Yum!Ê We had a naan oven not so far from the house.Ê That was completely fascinating to watch the baker shape the naan, make slits in it with his fingers, pick up a stick and - in a quick, smooth motion -Êpick up the dough, bend over the hole in the top of the ovenÊand plunk the naan smack dab on the side wall of the oven.ÊAfter the correct number of minutes, he would reach in and tug the baked bread off the wall with the same stick and pull it right out.Ê During that operation, he did not getÊburned by the fire, blazing away on the floor in the center of the oven.Ê It was almost like a seated dance, really; the movements were that graceful." - Peg Podlich

33. Men and boys washing and swimming in the Kabul River. There was much western influence in the newer homes and businesses.

Men and boys washing and swimming in the Kabul River.

34. Afternoon Shade.

A group of Afghan men look out over Istalif, about 18 miles northwest of Kabul, which was a centuries-old center of pottery making as well as other tourist attractions. The village was nearly destroyed by major fighting between "Northern Alliance" forces and the Taliban in the late 1990s.

35. A Buddha statue in Bamiyan Valley- a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

A Buddha statue in Bamiyan Valley- a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The two largest statues (not pictured here) were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001. "That was a bumpy, rough trip, but I'll never forget how wide and green the Valley was or how monumental those two Buddha statues were, carved into the face of the cliff...ÊÊThe statues were aÊmagnificent sight, even to someone like me, who did not really understand the history or technical achievement of those statues." - Peg Podlich

36. Bamiyan Valley.

According to UNESCO, "The cultural landscape and archaeological remains of the Bamiyan Valley represent the artistic and religious developments which from the 1st to the 13th centuries characterized ancient Bakhtria, integrating various cultural influences into the Gandhara school of Buddhist art. The area contains numerous Buddhist monastic ensembles and sanctuaries, as well as fortified edifices from the Islamic period. The site is also testimony to the tragic destruction by the Taliban of the two standing Buddha statues, which shook the world in March 2001."

37. Dr. Bill Podlich on a hillside in Kabul.

Dr. Bill Podlich on a hillside in Kabul. "My dad was a professor of Elementary Education, specializing in teaching Social Studies, at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona from 1949 until he retired in 1981. He had always said that since he had served in WWII (he trained soldiers against chemical warfare), he wanted to serve in the cause of peace. In 1967, he was hired by UNESCO as an Expert on Principles of Education, for a two-year stint in Kabul, Afghanistan at the Higher TeachersÕ College. Throughout his adult life, because he was interested in social studies, whenever he traveled around (in Arizona, to Mexico and other places), he continued to take pictures. In Afghanistan he took half-frame color slides (on Kodachrome), and I believe he used a small Olympus camera." - Peg Podlich.

38. Western cars.

1960s Afghanistan Bill Podlich (37)

39. There were also a Girl and Boy Scouts of Afghanistan.

1960s Afghanistan Bill Podlich (38)

40. Busy street.

1960s Afghanistan Bill Podlich (39)

41. Street sale.

1960s Afghanistan Bill Podlich (40)

42. Following World War II, which Afghanistan stayed out of, the Soviets and Americans competed for rights to build Afghan roadways.

1960s Afghanistan Bill Podlich (41)

43. Flying Kites by the Victory Arch.

1960s-Afghanistan-Bill-Podlich-42

44. Laundry Day.

1960s-Afghanistan-Bill-Podlich-43

45. Street Cafe.

1960s-Afghanistan-Bill-Podlich-44

Source:  pbase

Did you like these photos? Share them with your friends and check out 1970s Iran before the Islamic Revolution.

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar
wpDiscuz

You may also like...

Geralt Nowak

There will be something about me. I'm too lazy now.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. More information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

More info: Privacy & Cookies

Close this window

Read more:
#BuyMyVitara – When A Special-Effects Pro Tries To Sell A Car

Eugene Romanovsky wanted to sell his "best friend", a 1996...

Close