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The Chernobyl Disaster 30 Years Later

  • A liquidator, clad in a gas mask and protective clothing, pushes a baby in a  carriage who was found during the cleanup
  • All vehicles entering and leaving the 30km exclusion zone were meticulously cleaned and measured for radioactive particles
  • An image of the Unit 4 control console as it appears today
  • As part of this operation, Chernobyls iconic chimney was removed in 2014
  • At first, scooping was made by remote control robots, but they were to slow and broke.very often
  • Because Pripyat was new it had many modern luxuries other Soviet cities didnt had
  • Brand new fuel rods are fairly harmless
  • Chernobyl was the first nuclear power plant in Soviet Ukraine, a flagship of the peaceful atomic energy program of the USSR
  • Coal miners dug underneath the seething core to allow liquid nitrogen to be pumped in and cool the nuclear fuel
  • Convincing experienced workers from more populous parts of the Soviet Union to move to such a remote location proved challenging
  • first reactor - Unit 1 - was commissioned on the 26th of November 1977
  • Helicopter dropping sand mixed with  boron and lead to neutralise the reaction
  • Here you can see engineers working on the water pipes below where the reactor will be
  • In 1987, global attention turned to the Soviet elite who faced the task of deciding who would be held responsible for the Chernobyl disaster
  • In addition to a hospital and its nearby clinics, there were 15 kindergartens
  • It was the first nuclear power station ever to be built in the country
  • Lowering fuel fuel into the completed reactor
  • None of the machines used during the operation to clean up the zone could ever be used again
  • Once the power station was up and running, all staff entering and exiting the complex had to go through these radiation detectors
  • Over the years, animal mutations started to appear
  • Photographer Igor Kostin taking photographs after the explosion in the 4th reactor of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant
  • Retail came in the form of 25 shops including a bookshop, a supermarket and various smaller food stores
  • The construction began in 1970 in a remote region near Ukraines swamp-filled northern border
  • The control room of reactor four before the disaster
  • The control room of reactor four in 1998
  • The enormous, one-of-a-kind arch, 250m wide by 165m long
  • The group of engineers working on 26 April 1986 at the power plant. Tall man in middle is Anatoly Dyatlov, the deputy chief engineer.
  • The most dangerous operation was the plants roof clean-up
  • The plants own firemen immediately rushed into action
  • The poor firemen who had first battled the flames on the night of the explosion were dying of radiation syndrome one by one
  • The power plant before the disaster from the similiar angle
  • The Sarcophagus needed the strength the plant and withstand Ukrainian weather for 20-30 years
  • There were also 10 gyms, 3 swimming pools, 10 shooting ranges, 2 stadiums, 4 libraries and a cinema
  • This is 26-year-old Senior Reactor-Control Engineer Leonid Toptunov, one of the control room operators
  • This is a view from inside the damaged turbine hall
  • This is believed to be the first photograph ever taken of the accident, and the only photo that survives from that morning
  • This is the famous swimming pool
  • After the explosion at Reactor No. 4, the remaining three reactors at the power plant continued to operate
  • In the city of Chernobyl there stands a simple memorial to the liquidators who rushed to reactor number four in the immediate aftermath of the explosion

April 26 is the day the world commemorates the worst-ever nuclear disaster. Thirty years after the Chernobyl power plant exploaded, we post 40 photos and facts you might not know about the disaster. Learn more about the Chernobyl disaster on Wikipedia.

Also check: Drone Flight Over The City Of Pripyat

1. Chernobyl was the first nuclear power plant in Soviet Ukraine, a flagship of the peaceful atomic energy program of the USSR.

Chernobyl was the first nuclear power plant in Soviet Ukraine, a flagship of the peaceful atomic energy program of the USSR

2. The construction began in 1970 in a remote region near Ukraine’s swamp-filled northern border, 15 kilometers northwest of the small town of Chernobyl.

The desolate location was chosen because of its relative proximity to yet safe distance from Ukraine’s capital, a ready water supply – the River Pripyat – and the existing railway line running from Ovruc in the west to Chernigov in the east.

The construction began in 1970 in a remote region near Ukraines swamp-filled northern border

3. It was the first nuclear power station ever to be built in the country, and was considered to be the best and most reliable of the Soviet Union’s nuclear facilities.

It was the first nuclear power station ever to be built in the country

4. Convincing experienced workers from more populous parts of the Soviet Union to move to such a remote location proved challenging, so many of Chernobyl’s workers came straight from college/university. As a result, Pripyat was one of the ‘youngest’ cities in the Soviet Union, with an average age of only 26.

Convincing experienced workers from more populous parts of the Soviet Union to move to such a remote location proved challenging

5. Because Pripyat was new it had many modern luxuries other Soviet cities didn’t have.

Because Pripyat was new it had many modern luxuries other Soviet cities didnt had

6. In addition to a hospital and its nearby clinics, there were 15 kindergartens, 5 schools, a vocational school/college and a school of music and the arts for the children, with 1 expansive park and 35 smaller playgrounds for them to play in.

In addition to a hospital and its nearby clinics, there were 15 kindergartens

7. There were also 10 gyms, 3 swimming pools, 10 shooting ranges, 2 stadiums, 4 libraries and a cinema, or Pripyat’s own newspaper.

There were also 10 gyms, 3 swimming pools, 10 shooting ranges, 2 stadiums, 4 libraries and a cinema

8. Retail came in the form of 25 shops including a bookshop, a supermarket and various smaller food stores, a sports shop, a shop selling TVs, radios and other electronics, and a large shopping centre on the city’s central square.

Retail came in the form of 25 shops including a bookshop, a supermarket and various smaller food stores

9. This is the famous swimming pool.

This is the famous swimming pool

10. Although complications put the plant 2 years behind schedule, the first reactor – Unit 1 – was commissioned on the 26th of November 1977, following months of tests. Three more reactors followed: Unit 2 in 1978, Unit 3 in 1981, and Unit 4 in 1983.

first reactor - Unit 1 - was commissioned on the 26th of November 1977

11. Here you can see engineers working on the water pipes below where the reactor will be. The pumps push pressurised water through these pipes and up into the bottom of the core at a temperature of 270°C. There, it boils and comes out of the top at 284°C.

Here you can see engineers working on the water pipes below where the reactor will be

12. Lowering fuel into the completed reactor.

Lowering fuel fuel into the completed reactor

13. Brand new fuel rods are fairly harmless.

Brand new fuel rods are fairly harmless

14. Once the power station was up and running, all staff entering and exiting the complex had to go through these radiation detectors. They’re still used at the site today.

Once the power station was up and running, all staff entering and exiting the complex had to go through these radiation detectors

15. The group of engineers working on 26 April 1986 at the power plant.

Tall man in the middle is Anatoly Dyatlov, the deputy chief engineer. He supervised the test. At the moment reactor power slipped to 30MW, he insisted the operators continue the test which led to the disaster. In 1987, he was found guilty “for criminal mismanagement of potentially explosive enterprises” and was sentenced to ten years in prison.

The group of engineers working on 26 April 1986 at the power plant. Tall man in middle is Anatoly Dyatlov, the deputy chief engineer.

16. The control room of reactor four before the disaster.

The control room of reactor four before the disaster

17. The control room of reactor four in 1998.

The control room of reactor four in 1998

18. This is believed to be the first photograph ever taken of the accident, and the only photo that survives from that morning.

This is believed to be the first photograph ever taken of the accident, and the only photo that survives from that morning

19. The power plant before the disaster from the similiar angle.

The power plant before the disaster from the similiar angle

20. This is 26-year-old Senior Reactor-Control Engineer Leonid Toptunov, one of the control room operators.

He made a mistake when switching from manual to automatic control of the control rods, causing them to descend much farther into the core than intended. This resulted in an almost total shutdown of the reactor. Safety procedures required that the operators fully shutdown the reactor, as the RBMK became unstable at very low power. Unfortunately for the whole world, the Deputy Chief Engineer in charge that night – Anatoly Dyatlov – insisted that they continue. Over the next hour, the men struggled to bring the reactor up to power, disabling various safety systems in the process, and then began the test.

This is 26-year-old Senior Reactor-Control Engineer Leonid Toptunov, one of the control room operators

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2 Comments on "The Chernobyl Disaster 30 Years Later"

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sweta
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Great pics! This thing fascinates me. The worst ecological disasters have been in the most socialist countries. Who is paying for the cleanup? I assume, not Ukraine.

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Geralt Nowak

There will be something about me. I'm too lazy now.

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